Description

All trees will be 2yr, 80cm+, single stem with some lateral branching.

Cobnut trees will grow in most well drained soils, and once established will live for many years. The commercial cultivation of cobnuts dates back to the 1600s in England and France. Commercial production of hazels/cobnuts continues to this day in China, the United States, Turkey and a number of European countries. On fertile ground, yields of 1.5-3 tonne per hectare are achievable. It’s necessary to plant more than one variety of cobnut in order to achieve good pollination. The Irish hazel may also work as a pollinator.
We use the word ‘cobnut’ to cover all cultivated varieties of the hazelnut (including filberts). Please note that cobnuts are not self fertile, for success plant two or more different varieties. This will ensure good pollination.

Cultivars Available:

Nottingham

U.K variety, also known as Pearson’s prolific. Medium to large nuts, good flavour, moderately strong grower. Storage ability good. Very reliable cropper, cropping from a very young age. One of the best choices for Irish conditions. Male flowers: mid-season. Female flowers: mid-season. Good pollinator for other varieties.

Webb’s Prize

UK variety. Medium to large nuts, excellent flavour, relatively weak grower producing compact trees, good where space is limited. Less prone to wind damage. Storage ability good. Very reliable cropper, one of the best choices for Irish conditions. Frequently produces rooted suckers, good for propagation. Male flowers: mid-season. Female flowers: mid-season. Good pollinator for other varieties.

Cosford

UK variety. Medium to large nuts. Moderate to good flavour, strong grower. Storage ability fair. Reliable cropper but yields can be low. Male flowers: mid-late season. Female flowers: mid-late season. Very good pollinator.

Kentish Cob

Main variety grown in UK though French or Spanish in origin. Medium sized nuts, excellent flavour, moderate grower. Storage ability poor; used exclusively for the fresh nut market. Cropping ability in Ireland variable, best on a warm site. Male flowers: early-mid season. Female flowers: mid season.

EMOA1

Recent Dutch cultivar producing well in trials in UK and Netherlands. Good yields of large nuts.

Hall’s Giant

Originally from Germany. Also popular in France (where it is called ‘Merveille de Bollwiller’) Large nuts, good flavour (very sweet), very strong grower. Storage ability good. Reliable cropper, good yields. A good choice for Irish conditions. Not always popular because of its very vigorous growth and thick-shelled nuts. Male flowers: mid-late season. Female flowers: late (needs a late flowering male for pollination)